Iron Goddess Oolong Tea full

The Iron Goddess

It’s that time of year when Michiganders are blessed with a week of unseasonably warm weather that fills us with false hope that springtime is right around the corner. Sure, it will be 52 degrees on Wednesday, but realistically we still have about two months of cold temperatures and snow left. But, that doesn’t deter us from enjoying this weather while we can, no matter how briefly it sticks around. February’s brutal winter weather has done weird things to us northerners. After nearly a full month of single digit temperatures and wind chills in the negatives, temperatures in the teens and twenties are embraced. Today, it’s sunny and 36 degrees…and we have the back door propped open to enjoy fresh air, chirping birds, and a nice breeze.

Jon and I should probably be out and about, exploring our new hometown, but instead we loafed around, binge-watching Portlandia on Netflix. It’s been a low-energy sort of day, and I felt myself growing drowsy for a nap around noon-time. But, I have so many blogs to catch up on and books to read that a nap was out of the question. I was about to reach for some English Breakfast Tea for a quick kick of caffeine…but that I remembered I had still had some samples of Oolong tea provided to me by Teavivre. I decided to try that even though Oolong tea has low caffeine.

Much like the Avaata Supreme Nilgiri Green Tea that I wrote about last month, the Tie Guan Yin “Iron Goddess” Oolong Tea from Teavivre makes me feel nostalgic for springtime. Upon opening the packet containing tightly rolled Oolong tea leaves, I am greeted with the scent of Michigan’s springtime. It smells like fields of wet grass and wild flowers, and it makes my heart ache for blue skies, warm sunshine, cool breezes, and fields of green, green, green. I could not have picked a more perfect tea for a quiet, almost-springtime afternoon.

Iron Goddess Oolong is forgiving for a distracted steeper like myself. The package suggests brewing between 3-10 minutes, and it supports multiple steeps as well. The first cup I made, I steeped for about 4-5 minutes. The second cup I made, I steeped for about 8-9 minutes. The tea leaves also unfold into full, dark green leaves. When I poured my sample into my tea strainer, it just covered the bottom. After four minutes, the tea had bloomed and expanded and completely filled my tea strainer.

The color of the liquid is light yellow, and it smells vegetal. The flavor is more complex though. The first flavor that comes through is a crisp, grassy flavor, something that I associate with green teas. Then there is a sweet floral taste followed by a tart aftertaste that for some reason I associate with pineapple. These flavors are more pronounced during the first steep, and they become more mellow with each preceding steep. This is unlike any other Oolong tea I’ve tried, which have had more earthy aromas.

The Iron Goddess Oolong tea (named as such because the tightly rolled leaves supposedly make the pinging sound of small, iron pellets when you pour the leaves into your cup) is a tea that I would absolutely encourage you to try. Not only does it challenge ones perceptions of Oolong tea (sort of like Adagio’s Oooooh Darjeeling), it is also just a beautiful tea. I will drink it in winter while yearning for springtime, and I will drink it in springtime as a compliment to sunny, Sunday afternoons.

Pumpkin Spice Brulee Oolong Tea

Teaview: Pumpkin Spice Brulee Oolong (not quite #PSL)

Tea aficionados like to turn their noses up at tea from Teavana. And, understandably so. Teavana is notorious for masking otherwise decent tea with sweeteners and artificial flavors and other fruity/nutty/chocolaty additives. I am not a tea aficionado however, and I’ll admit, I’m distracted by flashy packaging, tempting names, and did somebody say chocolate?! But, even my experience with tea from Teavana is hit and miss. If you recall from my last weekend review, I splurged and purchased some Pumpkin Spice Brulee Oolong tea, and since today was a chilly 48 degrees when I woke up, I decided today would be a perfect day to try out this Autumn-inspired tea.

Teavana’s Pumpkin Spice Brulee Oolong tea has cinnamon, white chocolate pieces, dried pumpkin chunks, chocolate flakes, carob pieces, oolong tea, artificial flavoring, ginger, chicory root, pumpkin seeds, cloves, allspice, nutmeg, and coconut blossom sugar.

All of this sounds divine, but I was disappointed that oolong tea was number six on the list; it’s not really a priority. I blame myself for not reading the ingredients when I so hungrily added this tea to my cart.

Purple Angle Infuser Mug
Purple Angle Infuser Mug

I’m pretty awful at making tea according to directions, which I know is really, really important. I’m unsure of the temperature of water, but I did only steep for about three minutes. In my handy infuser mug! I like this mug because I can rest the infuser right along the edge of the mug, and the lid, which traps in steam and heat, also doubles as a small plate to rest the infuser on after steeping. Because, I will admit I am definitely a lazy sod, and I do not like walking to the sink after steeping. I’m not a fan of the size though. Bigger isn’t always better. It holds about 12 oz., but I usually only brew between 6-8oz.

The scent of the tea is inviting and cozy– cinnamon and chocolate seem the most predominant. But that’s all the positive things I can say about this tea. I did not care for the Pumpkin Spice Brulee Oolong tea. It’s sad because I did not taste the oolong tea at all. This isn’t one of those instances where all the additives mask the flavor of the tea, the tea just wasn’t there. I struggled to find the tea leaves amongst all the pumpkin pieces and chocolate chunks.

Teavana did succeed in making this tea taste like pumpkin, though sadly not like a comforting slice of pumpkin pie. You know how pumpkins smell when you are carving them into jack-o-lanterns? That’s the kind of aroma or flavor this tea had. It was…vegetal(?) and sour. I also wasn’t a fan of the sweetness of the Pumpkin Spice Brulee. I rarely add sugar or honey to my tea, so the sweetness of the coconut blossom sugar was really overpowering to me.

Overall, I wasn’t impressed, and at $13 for 2 oz. of “tea”, I won’t be buying any more. I’m not sure it’s entirely Teavana’s fault though. I’ve tried pumpkin spice teas in the past, and I wasn’t impressed then either. To get my fix of Autumn, I guess I’ll be sticking to pumpkin spice lattes.

If you’ve tried Teavana’s Pumpkin Spice Brulee Oolong tea, what did you think of it? Or, do you have a favorite Autumn-inspired drink?


Teaview: What do you mean you’re not black tea?

Every so often I’ll dive into a cuppa tea without reading into what I’m drinking, and I’ll make some pretty rash assumptions. This happened recently when I was brewing myself a cup of Adagio’s Ooooh Darjeeling. (Did I type all the “O”s?) During my first few brews of Ooooh Darjeeling, I thought to myself “Wow, this is a really nice black tea”. It wasn’t until I read the back of the bag that I realized it was actually oolong tea and not black tea.

A foolish mistake, and yet an easy one to make since Darjeeling tea is usually sold/marketed as black tea. Sometimes I’m such a noob when it comes to tea.

The ingredients? Well…Oolong tea, of course.

The scent of the leaves is delicate to me– slightly sweet and earthy, but I didn’t really taste either of these once brewed. Ooooh Darjeeling is unlike any oolong tea I’ve had. It doesn’t have that earthy aroma like most oolong teas I have tried. Instead, it tasted more like a black tea but not as strong and without much of the astringency (hence why I jumped to the conclusion that this was a black tea). Ooooh Darjeeling had a subtle floral aroma that I found to be delightful. I think there was supposed to be some fruity aromas as well, but I did not pick up on those.

This tea tastes great both unsweetened and sweet. While I haven’t tried it, I think Ooooh Darjeeling would make a nice iced tea if rock sugar were added (or whatever your sweetener of choice is).

Bottom Line, I really enjoyed this tea! It’s not a breakfast brew for me since I prefer bolder tastes in the morning. But, it’s the perfect cup to enjoy while reading books on a sunny afternoon.

On a side note, Adagio notes that this tea is from China; however “Darjeeling” denotes a type of tea from the Darjeeling region in India. Quit playing mind games with me, Adagio!

Teaview: I Love Oolong Time.

via Teavana

I would like to take this time to apologize to Oolong tea.  I’m sorry I said you tasted like a mix of grass, moss, wet tree bark, and mud.  I was wrong.  Really wrong.  But, can you really blame me when the only Oolong tea I had the misfortune to taste was from a tea bag?  But you, Six Summits Oolong from Teavana, have opened my eyes.

If any of you, dear readers, have ever felt the same about Oolong tea– that it tasted like a mouth full of wet earth, then I suggest to you try Teavana’s Six Summits Oolong tea.  It will change your mind about Oolong.  Six Summits Oolong is a combination of Oolong tea and dried raspberries (why are there strawberries in this picture?).

The scent of the dried tea is pleasant.  Actually, the way I’m about to describe it is kind of odd.  But, believe me, pleasant none-the-less.  It smells like a combination of dried catnip and red fruit roll-ups, folks.  It’s earthy, but the raspberries lend a certain sweetness to the scent.

The Oolong flavor was good.  I think my taste buds appreciated the quality of this Oolong tea more than the bagged tea that I had tried a few years prior.  Initially, I couldn’t taste the raspberries, they did create a pleasant aftertaste though–sweet and slightly tart, just like a raspberry should taste!

Bottom Line:  I received this as a Christmas present from my father.  Of all the teas he gave to me, this was the one I was most hesitant to try, so naturally I tried it first.  I’m glad I did!  Would I purchase this tea in the future?  Yea, probably.  But, more importantly, it opened my eyes that Oolong could actually taste good.  Better than good!  I’m more inclined to try out other Oolong teas in the future.

Another thing I feel is noteworthy is Teavana certainly does not cheat you out of red raspberries.  They were plentiful!  And I’m not talking raspberry crumbles either.  I’m talking whole. big. red raspberries.  And, I may or may not have popped one or two into my mouth before steeping…