OTP: My Favorite Couples

It’s the last day of February, so I wanted to get one more post up to celebrate the month of luuuurve. Love stories can be a hard sell, especially if they contain any of the trends I mentioned in my post about things I love and loathe about romance in books. But, I’m not a curmudgeon all the time. Here are my top of OTPs (one true pairings) of all time:

Amy and Rory from Doctor WhoAmy Pond and Rory Williams

I don’t care if this is an unpopular opinion. The eleventh Doctor is my favorite, and Amy and Rory’s love story is my favorite. Never has a TV show made me feel so many ups-and-downs. Laughing and cheering one episode and sobbing the next. There were a couple of times I didn’t think they were going to make it. Amy was so preoccupied by adventure and Rory was so insecure. But then I saw The Angels Take Manhattan, and I ugly cried because it was an all too perfect ending for Amy and Rory.

Holly Marten and Douglas FargoDr. Holly Marten and Fargo

The best TV show you’ve never watched is called Eureka, and I talk about binge watching the series on Netflix from time to time on Books & Tea. It is my absolute favorite TV show because it balances nerdiness and science fiction and drama and comedy and romance. And it’s perfect. (In fact, I might watch an episode or two after I publish this post). It also has the best theme song. Check it out:

Okay, but this isn’t about my love for the show (not entirely). It’s about my love for my favorite Eureka power couple, Dr. Douglas Fargo (yes, I did name my cat after this character), an accident-prone junior scientist who later becomes head of GD in an alternate universe and Dr. Holly Martin (played by Felicia freaking Day), who is a socially awkward rocket scientist and assists on Eureka’s mission to Titan, one of Saturn’s moons. Dr. Parrish can suck it!

ron and hermioneRon and Hermione

I don’t care what J.K. Rowling said. And I don’t care that Harper Honey has really sound arguments regarding the Romine Controversy. Ron and Hermione was the first ship I ever cared about.

Tidus and Yuna from FFXTidus and Yuna

There are usually some great love stories in the Final Fantasy games. Cloud and Areith/Tifa/Yuffie or Rinoa and Squall or Selphie and Irvine. The sort of love stories that seem to cross time and space, kind of like Rory and Amy. Yuna and Tidus from Final Fantasy X is my favorite couple, even if they are a little star-crossed. I think that’s what makes it so much more emotional.

jackie and jonJon and Me!

As if I would think of ending this post any other way? A year ago, I never thought I would be where I am today. Even four months ago, when this picture was taken (don’t mind my crazy hair! It was windy), I never thought I would be where I am today. “Blessed” is not a word that is usually apart of my vocabulary, but that’s how I feel with Jon in my life. I get to wake up next to someone who still thinks I’m lovely with sleep in my eyes, and I get to share dinner with someone who thinks my cooking is delicious even though the steak is a little too salty. I feel like we’re constantly encouraging each other to be better people, too. Don’t get me wrong, we accept each others “flaws”, if that’s what you want to call them. But, he brings me out of of my shell and makes me feel less cold, more human.

Who are your OTPs?

 

Ten Things We Did (and Probably Shouldn’t Have) by Sarah Mlynowski

Ten Things We Did and Probably Shouldn't Have by Sara Mlynowski Book Cover

Released: June 2011
Publisher: Harper Teen
Age Group: Young Adult
Genre: Contemporary
Pages: 368
Source: Purchased

When April’s dad relocates to Cleveland, April begs to move in with her friend Vi instead of leave behind everything that is comfortable to her, especially her boyfriend Noah. April’s dad agrees to this arrangement without knowing Vi’s mom won’t be present (she’s traveling the U.S. in an off-Broadway production). The girls provide April’s dad with a fake e-mail address, and Vi responds to every e-mail as if she were her mom. Let the bad decisions begin!

The plot is fast-paced but not hilarious like the book’s blurb promises. Perhaps it is a sign of my old age (is 26 old?) that I found the characters’ decisions to be unrealistic and obnoxious. When does buying a several thousand dollar hot tub with grocery allowance sound like a reasonable way to pay someone back? The characters in Ten Things We Did (and Probably Shouldn’t Have) are kind of equally annoying. With the exception of Dean, Vi’s boytoy, I didn’t like any of the characters. Vi is bossy and rude (and Dean can do a whole heck of a lot better). Marissa, as it turns out, is a crappy friend. Noah is just gross. And April is…inept; what sixteen year old doesn’t know how to do basic chores– like washing the dishes or laundering their clothes? What kind of sheltered life does she live, and why didn’t her parents teach her this? Ultimately, I found it really hard to root for anyone or sympathize with anyone in this novel.

Amid preposterous decisions, this novel tried to break out of the contemporary fluff model by trying to explore difficult issues like divorce, feeling abandoned by family, adoption, and eating disorders. Unfortunately, there was too much to address in such a short novel (with sooooo much going on), that discussion of these topics lacked consistency– kind of like If I Tell by Janet Gurtler. The only topic that was explored fairly substantially in this novel was April and her relationship with Noah. The couple has been together for two years, and April feels confident that she wants to take their relationship to the next level. There is no beating around the bush here– we’re talking about sex. Initially, I appreciated how the author handled the subject. Both Vi and April look into and discuss birth control options– perhaps the only good decision made in this entire novel. Additionally, I liked how the author navigated April’s feelings toward sex. It explores the behavioral script of what losing one’s virginity should be like– reality rarely meets expectations, and her insecurities are also explored; she notices that Noah is distant, and she feels having sex will make their relationship more stable. Alas, sex does not equal love– a hard lesson learned, yet that kind of thought process is a very real one regardless of age, experience, and gender. Unfortunately, the outcome of this decision is awful, and I don’t think it really added anything to the story. It just made me feel uncomfortable and disappointed that the experience was portrayed in such a negative light. A very grey topic was painted black and white.

Ten Things We Did (and Probably Shouldn’t Have) by Sarah Mlynowski was a quick read. I devoured it in one sitting, but readability does not make a book great. Honestly, I think the real reason I couldn’t put this book down was because the characters made some train wreck decisions, and I was rubbernecking. Overall, the book was okay even if there were a handful of parts that left me feeling disappointed, which is why I give this book two out of five stars.

Rating: Two Star Review